Land management

In this Oct. 5, 2019 photo, Daniel Leonard and his father Joe, right, stand near a heap of lumber on their family's property. The massive storm killed more than two dozen people in northern Florida, destroyed hundreds of homes and brought catastrophic damage to the region’s timber industry. (AP Photo/Bobby Caina Calvan)
October 13, 2019 - 12:01 am
BLOUNTSTOWN, Fla. (AP) — The sunsets are a sight to behold in Joe Leonard's neck of the woods these days. A year ago, lush stands of towering pines obscured the horizon, he said as he drove his pickup along a dusty Florida Panhandle road. Now, fields of thick grass mask row after row of stumps...
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In this Oct. 5, 2019 photo, Daniel Leonard and his father Joe, right, stand near a heap of lumber on their family's property. The massive storm killed more than two dozen people in northern Florida, destroyed hundreds of homes and brought catastrophic damage to the region’s timber industry. (AP Photo/Bobby Caina Calvan)
October 10, 2019 - 1:28 pm
BLOUNTSTOWN, Fla. (AP) — The sunsets are a sight to behold in Joe Leonard's neck of the woods these days. A year ago, lush stands of towering pines obscured the horizon, he said as he drove his pickup along a dusty Florida Panhandle road. Now, fields of thick grass mask row after row of stumps...
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FILE - In this a July 11, 2002, file photo, Dr. Kathleen Ramsay gets the attention of "Manchado," a Mexican Spotted Owl at the Wildlife Center near Espanola, N.M. A federal judge has halted tree-cutting activities on all five national forests in New Mexico and one in Arizona until federal agencies can get a better handle on how to monitor the population of the threatened owl. The order issued earlier Sept. 2019, out of the U.S. District Court in Tucson covers 18,750 square miles. (AP Photo/Neil Jacobs, File)
September 26, 2019 - 10:14 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — People who rely on wood stoves to heat their homes in the winter are scrambling to find other options after a U.S. District Court halted tree cutting on large swaths of national forests in the Southwest over concern about a threatened owl. "We have some elderly people that...
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Brazil's Minister of the Environment Ricardo Salles smiles for a photo during an interview with The Associated Press in Washington, Friday, Sept. 20, 2019. After facing international criticism for steeply rising rates of deforestation in the Amazon, Salles is visiting the U.S., France, Germany, and the United Kingdom to insist that there’s no big problem. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick
September 20, 2019 - 2:50 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — In July, Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro dismissed global concerns about fires raging in the world's largest rainforest, saying "The Amazon is Brazil's, not yours." Now, the far-right president's government has a new message: Everything's fine, and the rainforest is open for...
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In this photo released by Indonesian Presidential Secretariat, Indonesian President Joko Widodo inspects a burnt forest in Pelalawan, Riau province, Indonesia, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019. Widodo traveled to the area hardest hit by forest fires, as neighboring countries urged his government to do more to tackle the blazes that have spread a thick, noxious haze around Southeast Asia. (Laily Rachev, Indonesian Presidential Secretariat via AP)
Associated Press
September 17, 2019 - 7:06 am
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Indonesia's president traveled to the area hardest hit by forest fires, as neighboring countries urged his government to do more to tackle the blazes that have spread a thick, noxious haze around Southeast Asia. President Joko Widodo flew to Riau province, where nearly 50,...
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FILE - In this undated file photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, caribou from the Porcupine Caribou Herd migrate onto the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in northeast Alaska. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP, File)
September 12, 2019 - 5:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Democratic-controlled House on Thursday voted to reinstate a decades-long ban on oil and gas drilling in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge — a largely symbolic move aimed at reversing a plan by President Donald Trump to drill in the pristine refuge. The 225-193 vote...
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FILE - This Wednesday, July 24, 2019 file photo shows Rep. Joe Neguse, D-Colo., at a House Judiciary Committee hearing. Neguse is among Congressional Democrats who are questioning a Trump administration official's commitment to public lands and his attitude toward Native Americans. William Perry Pendley, the acting director of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, was asked Tuesday by the House Committee on Natural Resources about his past advocacy for selling public lands and comments he allegedly made about Native Americans. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
September 10, 2019 - 7:43 pm
DENVER (AP) — Skeptical Democrats questioned a Trump administration official Tuesday on whether he's committed to preserving public lands and whether he respects Native Americans. William Perry Pendley, acting director of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, appeared before the House Natural...
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September 09, 2019 - 11:45 am
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The U.S. government will allow oil and gas companies to make lease bids Monday on lands considered archaeologically sensitive near a national monument stretching across the Utah-Colorado border that houses sacred tribal sites. Included in the Bureau of Land Management's...
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FILE - In this July 16, 2019 file photo interior Secretary David Bernhardt listens during a Cabinet meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. On Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019, 30 retired executives from the Bureau of Land Management, which Bernhardt oversees, wrote him a letter saying that moving the bureau headquarters to Grand Junction, Colorado, and dispersing managers across 11 Western states could lead to worse stewardship of public lands. The department announced the move in July, saying it would lead to better decisions and save money, but some retired federal employees dispute that. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
September 05, 2019 - 7:31 pm
DENVER (AP) — Former public lands managers heaped criticism Thursday on a Trump administration plan to move the headquarters of the nation's largest land agency from Washington to the West. Thirty past high-ranking officials from the Bureau of Land Management said moving the bureau headquarters to...
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FILE - This July 9, 2017 file photo, shows a view of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in Utah. The U.S. government's final management plan for lands in and around the Utah national monument that President Donald Trump downsized is light on new protections for the cliffs, canyons, waterfalls and arches found there, but it does include a few more safeguards than were in a proposal last year. A summary the Bureau of Land Management provided to The Associated Press shows that the plan for the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southwestern Utah codifies that the lands cut out of the monument will be open to mineral extraction such as oil, gas and coal as expected. (Spenser Heaps/The Deseret News via AP, File)
August 23, 2019 - 2:04 am
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The U.S. government's final management plan for lands in and around a Utah national monument that President Donald Trump downsized doesn't include many new protections for the cliffs, canyons, waterfalls and arches found there, but it does have a few more safeguards than were...
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