National courts

FILE - In this June 28, 2019 file photo, Ashlyn Myers of the Coalition for Life St. Louis, waves to a Planned Parenthood staff member in St. Louis, Mo. The Trump administration says its new regulation barring taxpayer-funded family planning clinics from referring women for abortions is taking effect immediately. (Robert Cohen/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)
July 15, 2019 - 9:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Taxpayer-funded family planning clinics must stop referring women for abortions immediately, the Trump administration said Monday, declaring it will begin enforcing a new regulation hailed by religious conservatives and denounced by medical organizations and women's rights groups...
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FILE - In this Oct. 29, 2018, file photo, young plaintiffs stand on the steps of the United States District Courthouse during a rally in Eugene, Ore., to support a high-profile climate change lawsuit against the federal government. A lawsuit by a group of young Americans accusing the U.S. government of harming them by having fostered a fossil-fuels energy system faces a major hurdle Tuesday, June 4, 2019, when a federal appeals court hears oral arguments on whether the case should proceed. (Andy Nelson/The Register-Guard via AP, File)
June 04, 2019 - 2:13 am
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A lawsuit by a group of young people who say U.S. energy policies are causing climate change and hurting their future faces a major hurdle Tuesday as lawyers for the Trump administration argue to stop the case from moving forward. Three judges from the 9th U.S. Circuit Court...
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Margeaux Hartline, dressed as a handmaid, protests against a ban on nearly all abortions outside of the Alabama State House in Montgomery, Ala., on Tuesday, May 14, 2019. (Mickey Welsh/The Montgomery Advertiser via AP)
May 14, 2019 - 11:55 pm
MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama's Senate passed a near-total ban on abortion Tuesday, sending what would be the nation's most stringent abortion law to the state's Republican governor. The GOP-dominated Senate voted 25-6 to make performing an abortion at any stage of pregnancy a felony punishable...
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Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, left, speaks with Alexa Arredondo, 9, while meeting with community activists on immigration issues at a restaurant, Monday, May 6, 2019, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
May 07, 2019 - 3:21 pm
ADEL, Iowa (AP) — Kirsten Gillibrand is promising that, if elected president, she'll only appoint Supreme Court justices who will support the Roe v. Wade decision, imposing a key legal litmus test that's consistent with most Democrats' values but which White House contenders don't usually express...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, May 22, 2018, file photo, Ted Pappageorge, president of the Culinary Workers Union, Local 226, speaks before a vote on whether to authorize a strike, in Las Vegas. Some key labor leaders say they are starting to worry about the topics dominating the 2020 conversation. “They’ve got to pay attention to kitchen-table economics,” said Pappageorge. “We don’t quite see that.” (Steve Marcus/Las Vegas Sun via AP, File)
April 15, 2019 - 6:13 am
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Ardently liberal, pro-labor and anti-corporate cash, the field of Democrats running for president may look like a union activist's dream. But some key labor leaders are starting to worry about the topics dominating the 2020 conversation. The candidates are spending too much time...
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FILE - This June 2018 file photo shows protesters walking along Montana Avenue outside the El Paso Processing Center, in El Paso, Texas. The U.S. government has suddenly stopped force-feeding a group of men on a hunger strike inside a Texas immigration detention center, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement said Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019. The dramatic reversal comes as public pressure was mounting on ICE to halt the practice, which involves feeding detainees through nasal tubes against their will. (Rudy Gutierrez/The El Paso Times via AP, File)
February 15, 2019 - 5:16 pm
The U.S. government has suddenly stopped force-feeding a group of men on a hunger strike inside an El Paso immigration detention center, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement said. The dramatic reversal came Thursday as public pressure was mounting on ICE to halt the practice, which involves...
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July 27, 2018 - 1:40 pm
A federal judge has ruled that state and local governments cannot publicize federal government data about where prescription opioids were distributed — a blow to news organizations seeking to report more deeply on the nation's overdose and addiction crisis. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency is...
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Children look out a van window as they arrive at Lutheran Social Services, Thursday, July 26, 2018, in Phoenix. Lutheran Social Services said they were expecting reunited families separated at the border when apprehended entering the United States to come through their facility. (AP Photo/Matt York)
July 27, 2018 - 11:49 am
SAN DIEGO (AP) — Shy children were given a meal and a plane or bus ticket to locations around the U.S. as nonprofit groups tried to smooth the way for kids reunited with their parents following their separations at the U.S. Mexico border. The Trump administration said Thursday that more than 1,800...
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In this July 26, 2018, photo, Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh meets with Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Okla., on Capitol Hill in Washington. More than a decade after he served as what’s been called the president’s “inbox and outbox,” Kavanaugh’s role as White House staff secretary to President George W. Bush has become a flashpoint as Republicans push his confirmation to the Supreme Court. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
July 27, 2018 - 12:40 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Judge Brett Kavanaugh's role as White House staff secretary to President George W. Bush has become a flashpoint as Republicans push his confirmation to the Supreme Court. Democrats want to see records from that time. They say the documents are vital to understanding his approach...
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Retiring U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, right, takes a question from District Judge Edward J. Davila, left, during the Ninth Circuit Judicial Conference in Anaheim, Calif., Thursday, July 26, 2018. Kennedy announced his retirement in June saying he wants to spend more time with his family. He has been in recent years the Supreme Court's decisive vote in contentious cases on issues such as gay rights and abortion. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)
July 26, 2018 - 5:56 pm
ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) — Retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy on Thursday said he believes it is vital to maintain close ties with Europe and is concerned the U.S. appears to be drifting away. Kennedy, who announced his retirement last month, made the remarks Thursday at a conference of...
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